Wild About Math! Making Math fun and accessible

29Apr/111

Wild About Math blogs 4/22/11

Welcome to another edition of Wild About Math blogs!

I'm about to start a new blog about the intersection of Math+kids+exploration+programming+Mathematica.

I’m about to start a blog about programming with Mathematica as a way for kids (and adults) to get engaged with Math. I’m pretty new to Mathematica and I find myself getting stuck with some of the basics (which will make the new blog all the more valuable.)

If you have experience with Mathematica and can help me with writing some simple animations I would be incredibly grateful and, of course, I will acknowledge you in the blog and (if you like) I’ll link to your site.

In the new blog I’ll be writing how-to articles where I dissect some simple Mathematica code and show readers how to do neat explorations.

If you can help please drop me an email at

Math Teachers At Play Carnival # 37 is up at MathsInsider.

James Tanton has a new video. Yeah! This one is about a very odd relationship between partitions and the Fibonacci Numbers and, as always, it's very engaging.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TVOkD7hvCY[/youtube]

"Almost retired" Math Teacher Pat Ballew has a fun series of twitter post, On This Day in Math.

Brent at The Math Less Traveled has some nice illustrations of how one can visualize arithmetic operations with triangular numbers. Here's one picture.


Can you see what it illustrates?

In the gee-it-seems-alpha-can-do-anything department, check out this post at the 360 Blog.

Kalid at BetterExplained, has a great article: Intuitive Understanding of Sine Waves. With over 8,300 subscribers, readers are voting that Kalid's articles are indeed better explained.

Finally, there's a new Math Factor Podcast: HB. Puzzlers Pegg and Stephens!

By an amazing coincidence, world-class puzzle creators Ed Pegg (mathpuzzle.com) and James Stephens (puzzlebeast.com) were in Fayetteville Ark. on the very same day! We sit down and discuss the art of puzzle making, their own wonderful puzzles, and their personal favorites.

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  1. Kalid’s job is terrific, I agree…


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