Wild About Math! Making Math fun and accessible

31May/111

Upcoming popular Math books from Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press recently sent me a list of their upcoming popular Math books. I'm looking forward to reviewing each of them when they're published. I've given the publisher some attention in this blog as I enjoy their books.

In Pursuit of the Traveling Salesman: Mathematics at the Limits of Computation by William J. Cook (January 2012)

Cook tells the story of one of the most famous math problems in the world. He starts in the 1800s when Irish mathematician W. R. Hamilton first defined the problem and brings the story to current, high-tech attempts to solve it.

On the Princeton University Press site and on Facebook


Magical Mathematics: The Mathematical Ideas that Animate Great Magic Tricks by Persi Diaconis & Ron Graham (November 2011)

Diaconis and Graham merge two passions – card tricks and math. In this book you will learn step-by-step how to amaze your friends with card tricks! Then you will learn the math that guarantees the startling results.

On the Princeton University Press site and on Facebook


Fascinating Mathematical People: Interviews and Memoirs edited by Donald J. Albers & Gerald L. Alexanderson (October 2011)

Hopefully you are a fan of Mathematical People: Profiles and Interviews and More Mathematical People: Contemporary Conversations as this is the third in that series. Of particular note this time around is the interview with Dusa McDuff, but there are also interviews with Lars Ahlfors, Mary Cartwright, Atle Selberg, Tom Apostol, Jean Taylor, Fern Hunt, Harold Bacon, Thomas Banchoff, Leon Bankoff, Arthur Benjamin, and Joseph Gallian.

On the Princeton University Press site and on Facebook


The Best Writing on Mathematics 2011 edited by Mircea Pitici (November 2011)

This annual book assembles the best writing on mathematics from journals, magazines, and the web.

On the Princeton University Press site and on Facebook

 

 


Nine Algorithms That Changed the Future: The Ingenious Ideas That Drive Today's Computers by John MacCormick (February 2012)

MacCormick describes algorithms that are used in computing – page ranking, search optimization, image recognition, encryption, and others.

On the Princeton University Press site and on Facebook

 


Number Crunching: Taming Unruly Computational Problems from Mathematical Physics to Science Fiction by Paul Nahin (September 2011)

What would the fall be without a PUP math puzzle book – here Paul Nahin demonstrates how computers and physics can come together to solve tricky math problems.

On the Princeton University Press site and on Facebook

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  1. How To Solve the Beal and Other Mathematical Conjectures is free the next 3 days as an e-book from Amazon.


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